Why is the U.S. Government at War in the Middle East?

Workers Action
Now that the dust has settled, there can be little doubt that the U.S. war on Iraq was launched on the basis of multiple lies and deceit. Rather than the elimination of weapons of mass destruction, which the U.S. government itself has in abundance, Iraq’s oil was above all else in the crosshairs of those who were beating the war drums.
Here are examples of testimony from U.S. government experts on this question:
1
“As I told you, I worked for four administrations under three presidents. And in every one of those, our policy was that we would go to war to protect the energy reserves in the Persian Gulf. That is a major and very significant national interest that we have.” (James Baker, former Secretary of State, on Frontline, aired November, 2003).
2
“A new book by a senior CIA analyst who headed the agency’s task force on Osama bin Laden sharply attacks the Bush administration’s approach to Islamic terrorists, sternly criticizes the decision to invade Iraq and chides officials for trying to create a western-style democracy in Afghanistan.
“The author, who writes under the name ‘Anonymous,’ argues it is not dislike of freedom, democracy and Western culture that led bin Laden to wage war against America, but rather his disdain for U.S. policies and actions in the Muslim world, particularly the United States’ relation to Israel.
“He describes the invasion of Iraq as an ‘avaricious, premeditated, unprovoked war against a foe who posed no immediate threat but whose defeat did offer economic advantages.’ He compared it to the U.S. war against Mexico.

“‘Oil’, the author contends, ‘is at the core of U.S. interests in Muslim countries…’” (San Francisco Chronicle, 6/ 27/04).

3
“The fact is, the American effort in Iraq is essentially a colonial effort. We’re waging a colonial war. We live in the post-colonial era. This war cannot be won because it is simply out of sync with historical times.” (Z. Brzezinski, National Security Adviser to President Jimmy Carter, NewsHour, January 11, 2007).“He describes the invasion of Iraq as an ‘avaricious, premeditated, unprovoked war against a foe who posed no immediate threat but whose defeat did offer economic advantages.’ He compared it to the U.S. war against Mexico.
Consequently, the war in Afghanistan, far from being a “war of necessity,” as President Obama has asserted, is one more link in the chain of aggression. Al Qaeda would not be fighting the U.S. if the U.S. government withdrew all its troops from the Middle East and stopped subsidizing Israel’s role of oppression directed not only at the Palestinian people, but at the surrounding countries, including Syria, Lebanon, Iran, and Iraq.As long as the U.S. operates on the assumption that greed is good, which is the fundamental principle of capitalism, the U.S. will be at war, because greed will push this country into all corners of the world in pursuit of cheap oil, cheap labor and raw materials, and secure markets. As long as the U.S. government focuses exclusively on its own self-interest rather than extending a helping hand to countries mired in poverty by engaging in massive infrastructure developmental programs, the U.S. will find itself at war. But once we adopt the conviction that our well-being is tied to the well-being of humanity and that no one is free unless everyone is free, we will finally be rewarded with peace and a depth of happiness that is unimaginable by those who measure the magnitude of their pleasure by the number of their material acquisitions—who know the price of everything and the value of nothing.

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